AMPLIFY: Anita Hill

This month for Amplify, I decided to do something a little different. Instead of searching deep through the internet and archival websites for women to highlight, I looked right at the headlines. I had heard the name Anita Hill many times before this past week, but never knew who she really was.

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AMPLIFY: Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte

In 1865, La Flesche Picotte was born to Chief Iron Eyes (Joseph La Flesche) and his wife, One Woman (Mary) in northeastern Nebraska, in a tipi. Her father was Chief of Omaha Nation, but he felt that the Omaha people would only survive by assimilating to white culture. She attended school on the reservation until she was fourteen years old and was then sent to the Elizabeth Institute for Young Ladies in New Jersey to help her assimilate. La Flesche Picotte was called a “cultural broker” because she grew up in a mostly Western way, but still held on to the traditions of the Omaha people. 

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Amplify: Linda Martell

There are few people on this planet that would walk away from the trajectory of fame that Linda Martell left behind. After breaking big into the country music industry in 1969, our May AMPLIFY feature retired just five years later, in 1974. 

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Amplify: Frances Harper

We’re back, with the second installment of Amplify! I have a weird connection to our February Amplify feature, Frances Harper, but we’ll get to that later. Frances Harper initially came on to my radar as the first black woman to publish a short story, but her actual life story is just as compelling as any work of fiction.

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Amplify: Dolores Huerta

Our first Amplify feature is Dolores Huerta. Huerta has worked, and continues to work, tirelessly for the rights of farmworkers. She is the recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Freedom Award and the Eleanor Roosevelt Award, she is in the National Women’s Hall of Fame, and received the Puffin/Nation Prize for Creative Citizenship.

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